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Saturday, February 28, 2009

Monk's advice to Steve Lacy





This is Steve Lacy's work, who played with Monk in 1960. Lacy's introduction to Thelonious Monk: His Life and Music uses the above material explicitly.

Congratulations, Marcus North! 117 on debut ...









Our local Perth batsman (and part-time but excellent bowler), Marcus North has waited a long time for his place in the Australian Test cricket team. Now, he has shown his class in a stunning debut innings at the historic Wanderers ground in South Africa wheren Australia scored 466(3.70 runs per over)in their first innings.

Bloody beauty, Marcus.

Here I quote from 'cricinfo' - http://content-www.cricinfo.com/australia/content/site

A superb century on debut from Marcus North and a thrilling boundary-filled innings from Mitchell Johnson allowed Australia to take charge of the opening Test at the Wanderers, and the feel-good factor was enhanced in a final session in which they grabbed three wickets and reduced the run-rate to a crawl. Two century partnerships, both involving North, were followed by a stunning 53-run stand between Johnson and Peter Siddle, which included 26 from a Paul Harris over. Ben Hilfenhaus then took a wicket with his second ball in Test cricket as a glum crowd looked on, and it was clear that if South Africa are to wrest that No.1 ranking, they'll have to do it the hard way.

In 132 years of Test cricket, only 18 Australian batsmen have made centuries on debut. Michael Clarke was the last, in Bangalore in 2004, and North joined that select band with a wonderfully mature innings that allowed his team to take firm control. His 117 spanned nearly three sessions and 233 balls, and it was the 113-run partnership with Brad Haddin that changed the complexion of the match. The 117 that he went on to add with Johnson for the eighth wicket was a record for Australia against South Africa, and both stands served to highlight the maturity and composure of his batting.

At 29, he's no greenhorn and he came into this Test with 8880 first-class runs behind him. As much as the fluent drives and the precise sweeps against the slow bowlers, what was really notable was his judgment of which deliveries to leave. There were few wild wafts, and initial circumspection gave way to much more positivity after lunch.

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Black Factor Sports interviews ICC 's Charlie Burke

My youngest son, Charlie Burke, works for the International Cricket Council. In his role, he visited the Imparja 2009 Cricket Cup where they interviewed him, on camera, which you can access at http://nitv.org.au/blackfactor/

If I had more technical prowess I'd embed the video here >g<

Poem for Today ... & Art

Of all the words of pen or mouth,
the saddest are, "My stocks went south."

- Jon Corelis

... and while I'm here, take a look at she gone 2
http://ciccariello.viewbook.com/she
by Peter Ciccariello
More art available at http://invisiblenotes.blogspot.com/

Monday, February 23, 2009

First Poetry & Performance Night at The Fringe Gallery

































































Terry Farrell compered and welcomed the audience last night at The Fringe Gallery's inaugural night of literature and music down in Willagee. Myself and Sally Clarke (pictured) were guest readers, and Rob Binelli was the musician/singer, with instruments created by himself. The open mike section started with Mike (pictured), and included Janet Jackson, Peter Jeffery, Annamarie Weldon, Jo Clark, Terry himself and a young lady singer/songwriter, Susan.

It will be on again on the last Sunday of March, so please support The Fringe Gallery readings by attending and bringing friends! I will post full guest list and details before the event.

Laughter is the Best Medicine

Barrack Obama is visiting a Glasgow hospital.

He enters a ward full of patients with no obvious sign of injury or illness, he greets one.
The patient replies: Fair fa your honest sonsie face,Great chieftain o the puddin race,Aboon them a ye take yer place,Painch, tripe or thairm, As langs my airm.
Obama is confused, so he just grins and moves on to the next patient.
The next patient responds: Some hae meat an canna eat, And some wad eat that want it, But we hae meat an we can eat, So let the Lord be thankit.
Even more confused, and his grin now rictus-like, the President moves on to the next patient, who immediately begins to chant: Wee sleekit, cowerin, timorous beasty, O the panic in thy breasty, thou needna start awa sae hastie,Wi bickering brattlen
Now seriously troubled, Obama turns to the accompanying doctor and asks, 'Is this a psychiatric ward?'
'No,' replies the doctor, 'this is the serious Burns unit.'

Friday, February 20, 2009

ABC Radio National Books and Drama


20-27 February 2009


(Andrew's interruptionn: Could I point you to POETICA firstly - this one is a good one, I've heard it as a podcast;The Monkey's Mask on AIRPLAY - Dorothy Porter's famous PI verse novel; How Fiction Works with James Wood on 26th at 10am. A great week on ABC radio!)

POETICA
21/2/2009 15:00
26/2/2009 15:00
Blackwater: the poetry of Robert Adamson
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/poetica/stories/2009/2471246.htm
Since childhood, poet Robert Adamson has had a strong connection with the Hawkesbury River, north of Sydney. Producer Libby Douglas and Sound engineer Phillip Ulman travelled to the Hawkesbury and spent two days with Robert, his wife and photographer Juno Gemes. They recorded Robert in his home and on his boat, reading his poetry and talking about his life.


LINGUA FRANCA
21/2/2009 15:45
26/2/2009 15:45
Ka-NAIF = KNIFE
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/linguafranca/stories/2009/2495596.htm
Marking International Mother Language Day with Alexei Bayer on translating to and from his native tongue, and how he pronounced the very first word he learned in English, ‘knife’, as Ka-NAIF.


SUNDAY STORY
22/2/2009 08:30
Sean by Annette Trevitt
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/shortstory/stories/2009/2496831.htm
When his father leaves, Sean does not know who to blame.


AIRPLAY
22/2/2009 15:00
26/2/2009 19:00
The Monkey's Mask (Part 1), by Dorothy Porter, featuring Deborah Kennedy, Jeanette Cronin, Jessica Napier, Kelly Butler, Neil Fitzpatrick, Nicholas Eadie and Steve Vidler, music by Lesley Sly, produced by Libby Douglas
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/airplay/stories/2009/2471227.htm
Airplay celebrates the work of the late poet Dorothy Porter who passed away late last year with the most famous of her verse novels, The Monkey's Mask.
Jill Fitzpatrick is a tough streetwise private investigator on the trail of a missing person. Along the way she encounters cars going out of control on mountain roads, murder, deception and an unforgettable femme fatale. The Monkey's Mask has been described by reviewers as 'A tour de force that manages to be a complex thriller, a state-of-the-gender sexual novel and a convincingly lyrical on-rush of poetry'.


THE BOOK SHOW
Monday to Friday 10:00am (repeated at midnight)

The secret world of ghost writing (10.05)
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2009/2495925.htm
It's the publishing world's dirty little secret and it's booming. It's ghost writing. We delve into the world of anonymous scribes who make a living writing other people's stories.

23/2/2009
Writer's Rooms: Mem Fox (10:25)
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2009/2497062.htm
Have you ever wondered where writer's write; where novels are crafted; where classic lines are penned? In the first of our writer's rooms series, we take a guided tour of the private writing space of Australian children's author Mem Fox.

26/2/2009
How Fiction Works
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2009/2497071.htm
James Wood talks about his new book How Fiction Works an account of character, point of view, and what he calls lifeness.

THE BOOK READING
Monday to Friday 2.00pm
9/2/2009 - 27/2/2009
The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookreading/stories/2009/2260727.htm
Flann O'Brien's surreal comic novel The Third Policeman is a kind of rural Irish Alice in Wonderland where people and bicycles swap identity, police stations exist in other dimensions and eternity is reached by taking a lift downwards in a forest.


FIRST PERSON
Monday to Friday 10.45am
23/2/2009 - 11/3/2009
American Journeys, written and read by Don Watson, produced by Justine Sloane-Lees
URL: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/firstperson/
As an outsider, and travelling by rail, Don Watson investigates the meaning of the United States: its confidence, its religion, its heroes, violence, material obsessions, landscapes and people. From the window of the train he peers out to the landscape and history unfolding on the other side of the glass, while within he shares encounters with cowboys, political lobbyists, artists, Christian aid workers, shock jocks, and many other ordinary and extraordinary people. Through them he discovers the incomparable genius of America – its optimism, sophistication and riches – and also its darker side, its disavowal of failure and uncertainty.

Sunday Evening @ The Fringe Gallery - Sally Clark & Andrew Burke

It is always flattering to be asked to open a series of almost anything, so I'm standing tall - which is difficult for me, right - to be one of two guest poets at The Fringe Gallery for their first Poetry and Performance Night this Sunday night in Willagee. The other poet is Sally Clark with a new book out, if I'm not mistaken. & somewhere there is a musician - I'll need to do more research on that score (no pun intended).

Poetry and Performance Night
at the Fringe Gallery
Last Sunday night of every month
commencing Sunday 22nd February


About the gallery

The Fringe Gallery is an artist run studio and exhibition space in Willagee which seeks to encourage emerging artists with the exhibition or performance of their work. The Gallery provides affordable exhibition space for hire and runs various art classes for the public. The Gallery also provides five artist’s studio space for lease.

About the poetry and performance night

The night will include:
• Readings from invited poets and writers
• An open mike section ( if you wish to read please come early to register)
• Some music by local artists
• A book exchange ( bring along any old but worthy books that you wish to sell)

When: 7.30 – 10 pm Last Sunday of every month
Where: The Fringe Gallery Willagee, 94 Bawdan Street Willagee
(opposite Webber Reserve)
Cost: $5.00. Refreshments can be purchased on the night




For further information contact:
Terry on 0412 911562 or email to tfarrell@linq.net.au

Thursday, February 19, 2009

William Carlos Williams is applauded at Home


Williams enters Hall of Fame

(by Daniel O'Keefe - February 11, 2009)(from http://www.southbergenite.com/NC/0/2268.html

Doctor, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and lifelong Rutherford resident William Carlos Williams is one of 13 greats from the Garden State inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame's class of 2008. This year Williams joins fellow literary greats Walt Whitman and F. Scott Fitzgerald as well as popular celebrities Jon Bon Jovi, Shaquille O'Neal and Jerry Lewis.

"It's about time," said Daphne Williams Fox, Williams' granddaughter. "I'm hoping it opens more doors for his work." Though throughout the academy Williams is widely considered one of the most influential American poets of the last century, he isn't nearly as well known to the general public. However, Fox and other Rutherford locals have been working lately to make his name better known in the state.

"I was taken aback by all the people who supported him," said Fox. "For me this was like coming home again." She noted a book by her father about Williams, "Title," as well as a Caldecott Honor-winning children's book "A River of Words," have recently been published.

The Rutherford Public Library has a rotating exhibit of items belonging to Williams, such as his violin, correspondence with his publishers, his straw hats and some of his medical equipment such as a microscope and a blood pressure machine. Williams' dual roles as poet and local doctor are well symbolized by his desk which had a top that could be flipped over with a flat desk on one side for medical work and a typewriter attached to the other side for writing in between appointments. The library's collection is the most extensive of any of its kind, according to library director Jane Fisher.

Della Rowland, founder of the William Carlos Williams Symposium which began in 2005 and celebrated the poet's 125th birthday last year, said the work of people such as Fox, Fisher and borough historian Rod Leith over the past few years has helped focus wider attention on Rutherford and its native poet.

"I'm pleased he's being recognized in his home area for which he drew all his inspiration," she said. "What's happened here in Rutherford in terms of the poetry readings and everything has rippled out to the whole state."

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Singing the Praises - of Stimmung and The Five Peace Band


I've had a full week, the highlights of which have been music.

First, there was John McLaughlin (gtr), Chick Corea (keyboards), Kenny Jarrett (sax), Christian MacBride (bass) and Brian Blade (drums) electrifying the night air at the Pioneer Women's Memorial Gardens within our beautiful Kings Park (1 thousand acres on the crest of the city of Perth). My friend Perry mused as we walked the long distance from our parking spot, I wonder what they're going to play. Fair question: it could have been mainstream jazz, Indian-tinged pyrotechnics, night club fusion or any number of things in between.

They sauntered out on to stage - a blue lit giant music shell before the lake - and swung right into a fast electronic contemporary jazz piece, influenced mainly by McLaughlin's guitar. The compering, such as it was, was shared between John and Chick. Very little chatter, but relaxed announcements. In John's humility, he always introduced all the rest of the band, perhaps thinking or knowing that a lot of people were not essentially from the jazz world but the rock-end of fusion - Mahavishnu Orchestra et al. John introduced the second piece, which was a composition by Chick Corea. The solos were always exciting, and built to a point just after when I expected them to release, if you catch my drift. You would expect the world of John and Chick, and you'd be right. Kenny played a more restrained role, like he was a second-stringer - but nothing could have been further from my mind. Kenny was one of the main reasons I went. It wasn't he went into his shell or anything so dramatic, just he wasn't as front-line as I had hoped. The drummer's name was stated a lot during the performance, but I am only guessing at Brian Blade. He was a fiercesome storm behind each number, and even when he switched to brushes for a quieter segment, he was still as busy as Elvin Jones. At times I miss the subtle playing style of people like Max Roach or Connie Kay, but perhaps I'm an old fuddy-duddy.

The eye-opener, or ear-opener more accurately, was the masterful and melodic playing of Christian MacBride. A beautiful bass player in anybody's book, be it electric or bull-fiddle. He was a revelation to me - memories of Jaco Pestorius and Charlie Mingus flew through my intoxicated head.

A stand out piece was the Hymn to Andromeda, a new piece composed by Chich Corea and about to be released on a new CD. It started with synthesizer and electric piano, and permutated through sections to a frenetic jazz crescendo as endo. I would have liked a return to the original theme and instrumentation as denouement, but that's my mind, tidying up. Another piece worth mentioning was the surprise inclusion of Dr Jackyl, a track first released by Miles Davis 50 years ago.

The evening was perfect weather, funky coffee, huge and appreciative crowd, kookaburras laughing on cue, and over two hours of music (I didn't keep a watch on it). Parking was the only drag, but that's average for this kind of event, isn't it.

An American friend has described a recent night out at a Cassandra Wilson show - and I think ours, slightly different in that it was a concert in the outdoors, was a far superior event. But it did cost $80.

Secondly, there was Stockhausen's Stimmung, performed by the Theatre of Voices at University of Western Australia's Hackett Hall. I went in ignorance of this work, even though friends had offered to let me borrow their CDs of it. I wanted to be surprised and to take the creative journey as freely as possible. This meant not researching the piece. It was an amazing journey - incredibly beautiful music sung by six voices, and wit and improvisation all combined. I didn't understand a word of the German songs and poems embedded in the work, but that didn't matter one iota. When it finished - about an hour and forty minutes - I wanted them to start again. When I arrived home, I immediately researched it and read the program notes, etc. & then was even more amazed. Absolutely beautiful piece of music, but very difficult to pigeon-hole. Somewhere it has been said that Stimmung is a perfect doorway in to Stockhausen's work for the uninitiated, and I would agree with that. I have heard lots of Stockhausen's works, but this is the most lyrical and witty.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Louis Bellson RIP (1924-2009)


Louis Bellson,world famous jazz drummer, has died at the age of 84 in Los Angeles.

He was a great jazz musician, composer, arranger, bandleader, and long-time educator.

Louis Bellson won the 1940 Slingerland National Gene Krupa drum contest at the age of 17, cutting out 40,000 drummers and launching a career that began with the Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, and Harry James big bands.

I remember him from the early ’50s with Duke Ellington, when he wrote and performed a monumental drum solo piece Skin Deep. It was one of the reasons I learnt drums as a teenager (but you blame it all on him). He left the Ellington band to work as musical director for Pearl Bailey. They married in 1953. The marriage lasted until Bailey’s death in 1990.

Sunday, February 15, 2009

Chick Corea, John McLaughlin & Kenny Garrett tonight in Kings Park



Tonight we hear some of the greats of contemporary jazz, right here in Perth, in our thousand acre park overlooking the city. The venue sounds idyllic, but will the sound be idyllic? It depends on the night winds blowing and the amphitheatre acoustics of the Pioneer Women's Fountain location. Not ideal for my once in a lifetime chance to see these guys together - but, that's the deal. And I am looking forward to it.

Saturday, February 14, 2009

Put it on your calendar now ...

Poetry and Performance Night
at the Fringe Gallery
Last Sunday night of every month
commencing Sunday 22nd February

Special Guest Poet: Andrew Burke


About the gallery

The Fringe Gallery is an artist run studio and exhibition space in Willagee which seeks to encourage emerging artists with the exhibition or performance of their work. The Gallery provides affordable exhibition space for hire and runs various art classes for the public. The Gallery also provides five artist’s studio space for lease.

About the poetry and performance night

The night will include:
• Readings from invited poets and writers
• An open mike section ( if you wish to read please come early to register)
• Some music by local artists
• A book exchange ( bring along any old but worthy books that you wish to sell)

When: 7.30 – 10 pm Last Sunday of every month
Where: The Fringe Gallery Willagee, 94 Bawdan Street Willagee
(opposite Webber Reserve)
Cost: $5.00. Refreshments can be purchased on the night




For further information contact:
Terry on 0412 911562 or email to tfarrell@linq.net.au

Friday, February 13, 2009

Every little bit helps.

http://www.redcross.org.au/vic/services_emergencyservices_victorian-bushfires-appeal-2009.htm

Hear Australian Poets read their own works


From the ABC's website -

A Pod of Poets is a series of eleven, 40-minute podcasts of Australian poetry, read by the authors. The poets come from all over Australia; some are emerging talents and some are established; several of them are on the school syllabus.

The audio is available to download and you'll also find transcripts, photographs, interviews, and more. We hope that this website will be an ongoing resource for researchers, schools, universities and the general podcast audience.

Subscribe to the podcast series here at http://www.abc.net.au/rn/poetica/features/pod/default.htm.

The poets are: Robert Adamson, Les Murray, Joanne Burns, John Kinsella, Josephine Rowe, Craig Billingham, L.K. Holt, Aidan Coleman, Jayne Fenton Keane, Martin Harrison, Sam Wagan Watson, Kathryn Lomer, Esther Ottaway, John Clarke and Jordie Albiston.

We look forward to bringing you the work of this vibrant and diverse group.


Poetica · Saturday 14 February 2009

To mark the launch of this special podcast series, four of the programs will also be broadcast on Poetica, continuing with Jayne Fenton Keane on Saturday 14 February at 3pm.

*

For access and further information go to http://www.abc.net.au/rn/poetica/features/pod/default.htm

Victorian Bushfire Images from The Age

http://www.theage.com.au/photogallery/2009/02/10/1234028024842.html


There must be the right words to say about the bush fires tragedy in Victoria but I haven't found them. My mouth dries up whenever I let my imagination go to the last seconds of those poor victims' lives. Blame? The game has begun, as we all knew it would, but I hope it will peter out through lack of support very quickly. A cohesive and solid plan for the nation for such tragedies in future is the only activity worth pursuing now. Perhaps Tim Flannery and General Peter Cosgrove could be asked to head such a multi-disciplinary team. The immediate on-the-ground task is the re-establishment of the survivors' lives, and many heroes are already working day and night at that task, from the armed forces to local CWA groups. I thank them all for doing what I can't help do from this distance.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

The right way to plural - from the Sydney Writers Centre

The Sydney Writers Centre advertises writing courses of all sorts and styles, some at the Centre and many on-line, but as a free tip today they sent a short piece on Plurals at http://www.sydneywriterscentre.com.au/ . I think it is worth sharing as many people get these areas wrong consistently.

TIP: The right way to plural


Noun plurals - there are so many irregularities here that it can sometimes be difficult to find the right word! Some of these may seem obvious but it’s amazing how many times people get it wrong.

Here are some handy rules for a few of those nasty irregular plurals:

* If the word ends with '-us' the plural form will end in '-i'
For example: cactus to cacti, nucleus to nuclei, focus to foci
* If the word ends with '-on' the plural will end
in '-a'
For example: phenomenon to phenomena,
criterion to criteria
* If the word ends with '-o' the plural will have an
'-es' added
For example: potato to potatoes or tomato to
tomatoes.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Creative Writing Workshops - All welcome!

led by Andrew Burke
each and every Wednesday
10am to noon
Tom Collins House

home of the Fellowship of Australian Writers
in the trees
cnr Wood and Kirkwood Streets
SWANBOURNE.


$20 per session, or $120 per 8 sessions
(Unwaged and pensioners of all types, $15 per session)

Sunday, February 08, 2009

Quote of the Day

Awards are merely the badges of mediocrity.

- Charles Ives

Thanks to Doug BARBOUR for this one.

Saturday, February 07, 2009

Creative Writing Workshops by the Sea


Last Wednesday was the first of my Creative Writing Workshops at Tom Collins House for 2009. We had a small number but all interested in furthering their writing skills and all eager to shake the rust from their pens (or laptops). If, Mr Rudd wishes to throw money at the population, perhaps he should subsidise computer equipment for beginning writers who are not cashed up. Just a thought ...

Anyway, I thought LOVE would be a popular subject so I went with that trying to win back Valentine's Day to a Romantic base: write a Romantic poem or text to your partner or someone you'd like to have as partner. There were howls of shock at the idea! It was not popular - so I persevered and soon we were discussing the various aspects of love you could approach, with examples from Nikki Giovanni, ee cummings, Galway Kinnell and my friend Max Richards from Melbourne. He had emailed a nostalgic tender love poem of sorts earlier that day, and I used it in the group. It was about the most popular poem there, so 'local grown' is again the best >g<

A couple of phone calls have come in for people wanting to know what time it starts. That's strange because I always write the hours it runs when I advertise it. Oh, well, maybe they just want to make contact first, and use that as an opening gambit.

Here are the details again:

Creative Writing Workshops
lead by Andrew Burke
each and every Wednesday
10am to noon
Tom Collins House

home of the Fellowship of Australian Writers
in the trees
cnr Wood and Kirkwood Streets
SWANBOURNE.

$20 per session, or $120 per 8 sessions
(Unwaged and pensioners of all types, $15 per session)



Cartoon from one of the funniest cartoonists in Oz, Judy Horacek at http://www.horacek.com.au/

Friday, February 06, 2009

The Private Press invites you to submit ...


Call for Poems

'I can't figure out if you're a detective or a pervert.'

Seeking poems that explore the twisted world of David Lynch's Blue Velvet for The Private Press's next chapbook anthology.

Go to for further details and Submission Form http://zoo.f2s.com/privatepress/callforpoems.html

Thursday, February 05, 2009

Word of the Year? Check it out!

The Macquarie Dictonary has a very entertaining site with lots to amuse any wordsmith. They have selected a Word of the Year and also a list of winning new words in various categories.

The Macquarie Dictionary Word of the Year Committee comprises:

Dr Michael Spence, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sydney
Professor Stephen Garton, Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Sydney
Les Murray, renowned Australian poet
Susan Butler, Editor of the Macquarie Dictionary

Go to http://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/anonymous@919FFC17548334/-/p/dict/WOTY08/index.html?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_content=swc+newsletter+085

Monday, February 02, 2009

A Book of Music - by Jack Spicer

Coming at an end, the lovers
Are exhausted like two swimmers. Where
Did it end? There is no telling. No love is
Like an ocean with the dizzy procession of the waves' boundaries
From which two can emerge exhausted, nor long goodbye
Like death.
Coming at an end. Rather, I would say, like a length
Of coiled rope
Which does not disguise in the final twists of its lengths
Its endings.
But, you will say, we loved
And some parts of us loved
And the rest of us will remain
Two persons. Yes,
Poetry ends like a rope.



from http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19747
Steve McCaffery: If the aim of philosophy is, as Wittgenstein claims, to show the fly the way out of the fly bottle, then the aim of poetry is to convince the bottle that there is no fly.

2009 Creative Writing Workshops - with a cool sea breeze ...

start 10am to Noon Wednesday 4 February
at Tom Collins House,
corner Kirkwood and Wood Streets, Swanbourne,
set in amongst the trees
and home of The Fellowship of Australian Writers.

$20 per session or 8 weeks for $120.
Unwaged and disabled, $15
.

Conducted by Dr Andrew Burke, a Creative Writing teacher with a couple of decades experience in steering people towards creating texts in their own voice.

In a fun loving and open-hearted way, we approach writing stories, poems and life stories through notes, writing exercises, group discussion and examples. Subjects we have covered in the past include Characterization, Dialogue, Description, Editing your own Work (and others), Plot versus Unplot, the many styles and opportunities for poetry, writing competitions, how to send your work away, Concrete Images, the song in the words ...

"I am an experienced Creative Writing teacher with a couple of decades experience in steering people towards creating texts in their own voice."
Andrew Burke

Sunday, February 01, 2009

Poetry and Performance Night at the Fringe Gallery

Last Sunday night of every month
commencing Sunday 22nd February



The Fringe Gallery is an artist run studio and exhibition space in Willagee which seeks to encourage emerging artists with the exhibition or performance of their work. The Gallery provides affordable exhibition space for hire and runs various art classes for the public. The Gallery also provides five artist’s studio space for lease.

About the poetry and performance night

The night will include:
• Readings from invited poets and writers
• An open mike section ( if you wish to read please come early to register)
• Some music by local artists
• A book exchange ( bring along any old but worthy books that you wish to sell)

When: 7.30 – 10 pm Last Sunday of every month
Where: The Fringe Gallery Willagee, 94 Bawdan Street Willagee
(opposite Webber Reserve)
Cost: $5.00. Refreshments can be purchased on the night




For further information contact:
Terry on 0412 911562 or email to tfarrell@linq.net.au